NEPD home
 

your thoughts

 
 

Pat says:

I don't understand why George Galloway has got involved with the SWP and "RESPECT". However whatever he does seems preferable to the antics of Ken ("Bomber") Livingstone. His position as reported in the Observer article seems to be - stick by Blair and then vote New Labour. Later he is said to call for compulsory voting.

I suppose this is an example of how political careerism can infect everyone - after all Livingstone too once claimed to stand up for Palestinian rights. Now he stands shoulder to shoulder with Blair who in turn publicly supported the Bush/Sharon land grab recently. There's a lesson for us all here.

I hope George Galloway does eventually get involved with the NEPD - he did with the Charter for Basic Democratic Rights did he not?

I can report that some people are intending to vote for New Labour to "oppose the BNP" but many are also saying that because we have postal votes and you need a witness on your form they will not use it. Such is the distrust of the State under New Labour. It will be interesting to see if postal voting does increase the "turnout" as New Labour hopes. It will be worth analysing this area by area - a drop in votes will show, I think, the suspicion of state gathering names mentioned above - but that is in areas where the turnout is already miniscule.

Loic says:

In this incredible time and end of year, I am recontacting you to wish you all the bests things and not just only on a personnal level.

I don't follow very, very well english's news except that I guess the commun media still not recognize there were no reason for a war in Irak and by fact that the people are still fooled by these same "medias" either in Irak, UK or France....
It is a real pity that "crazy" bloke like Ian Huntley are let free with enough police report showing is dangerous and that just with pseudo proofs a war has been triggered on a nation eventhough mislead but that has been earlier supported by all "our profond democraty"....

In both case, it is miserable policy, Isn't it?

I am a bit cynical about the all thing, but I don't think it's a reason enough to be passive. And I truly think that a solution exists and if "our" leader that introduce themselves as the defenders of democracy can't propose any collective's projects neither making alive democraty and just content themselves occupying power's position, that means managing chaos, then people have more than just the Right they have the Obligation to make them fall.

No need to be violent for such a need in such a situation, truth is a weapon bigger than any WMD and can clear up all these liars and our own weaknesses that can make us being afraid to face reality like sheeps in a flock as would have said Rabelais.

That's why I would like you to be sure you got at least all my moral support and my activist support here in France. I should say "french kingdom", no more republic, impossibe for me to call it a republic especially not democratic so much there is no political party's opposition determined versus the "King" Chirac that must feel funny.Indeed its rather hard to defend on one hand freedom in Irak and international's laws, and on the other hand dictatorship in Tunisia and crashing down any social benefits in the country and the funniest but not the smallest being taken to californian court over financial corruption in Executive life affair. No wonder who's going to pay exept docile people. But shall we be just docile? don't we have others rights than being just docile social animals?
I don't really think You would say YES, and rather agreeing that we are human beings and by fact able to create and decide even on a collective, social or communitarian level and also local, national or international level the way we want (or not) to lead our life (or our life to be lead).

And the way the UE fails on the Constitution dossier just confirm me that leaders without any people's support or trying to be supported and don't even bother talking to people, to us by the same time; I didn't say "propaganding" that they know how to do, educated for it in "marvelous" ENAlike schools and helped by theirs "magic" communicators and "murdoch's" friends or murdoch himself.

Time is coming to be our own leader to show by who we want to be lead and by which means!!! Let me be categorical!!

I hope I haven't been too long or "emphatic" but I wanted just to greet you, the NEPD and its process.I would like also to attract your attention on an american candidate to the US presidency called Lyndon Larouche that represent for me a real alternative to the "hawks"(neoconservator Cheney's team with their Bush's guignol) and their warrior, imperialist and speculative's new policies.
Larouche website is http://larouchein2004.net . He is calling for a new Bretton Woods traity and an worldscale productive economy based on a kind of new "New Deal" under the control of new international and democratic credit's institution. Would you please let met know if you have ever heard and what you think about him?

Bests wishes, happy christmas for the christians, happy winter for the atheist and long live to the Network.

friendly and sincerely, Loic

PS: ENA means Ecole Nationale d' Administration but it is nearly completly corrupted by what french people call Neoliberalism and its representants and doesn't train anymore lowclass people neither any good "dirigeants". It has mainly become a selective, autoreproductive, neoconservative tool to chose the "so called" elite.

Kate writes

Andrew's contribution raises some very important questions and I support his view we need to get beyond being "lefty". There can be a view of globalisation which is "old lefty", with nationalist overtones and a hope for a return to some old and better past. My view is that we need to go beyond the status quo, not pray hopelessley for a return to some mythical past when Old Labour was a wonderful socialist party in parliament - it never was!

Andrew is right about the need to explore the conflict between globalisation and political sovereignty but I would argue that it is precisely that conflict that has made parliamentary democracy an empty shell. New Labour is quite clear that the role of the state today is to act as the Executive Board of Britain plc on behalf of the multinationals. Most MPs know that parliament's role in the New Labour project is limited to a rubber stamp. It is disingenuous to say New Labour are "quite pro-market". In fact they are entirely pro-market and their harsh and oppressive laws flow from that and are not a separate issue. We do have the forms of parliamentary democracy, but they are empty - we need to get beyond them to create real democracy. Many people know this - they simply don't bother to vote. Are they just stupid? No, they know there's no point, it won't help improve their lives.

The idea that the "free market" is only free when it suits the Americans, is a very sparse concept. The "free market" is not just a US conspiracy ­ there are powerful bodies like the WTO and GATS set up to enforce the free market. Ideas, including the ideas of the Right, do have force, when they are taken up by people.

back to top

Andrew says

1 We do live in a parliamentary democracy still, it would be a lie to claim otherwise. Pointing out the positive advantages as well as the limits of parliamentary democracy would be more fruitful.

2 Are Labour reformist in character is a good question. they are quite pro-market for a labour administration but it is useful to remember that the "free-market" is not and has never been a fact, more a political/theological rhetorical position. Labour are very pro-state at present, which is much more of a problem for the working class and should be a good starting point for a critique. Privatising the Health Service is not. in principle, a big problem.

3 The 'multinationals' or now, 'global corporations' theory of why the world seems more volatile than in the past is little more than an old lefty get out clause, not a fact. A more interesting area to look at is the relationship between 'globalisation' (the degree and form of interpenetration of national capitals) and political sovreignty today. Of course companies make profits (surplus), of necessity, what's new?

Are you going to start a political party or a campaigning organisation, if so what interests and principles will you strive to represent? My suggestions would be to fight for civil rights, free speech, secularism and science and against state interference in our lives via anti-terrorist, environmental and anti-smoking initiatives for a start.

back to top

Dan says Sustained campaign required

I feel that in the current political climate there is no real choice for
people who believe in promoting the interests of society as a whole - we can't trust New Labour, the Lib Dems are free-marketers at heart, and the socialist movement is too fragmented to have any impact in parliament.

Yet, as pointed out, the anti-capitalist movement in Britain and worldwide is huge, and growing all the time. Groups like the NEPD are needed to co-ordinate it, and bring together groups who may not appear to have that much in common. We don't just need a few marches, but a sustained campaign including a real (and realistic) political agenda. Greater regulation is needed for corporations, including a comprehensive licensing system to ensure the public good is put at least on a par with profit. Elected regional assemblies (with full fiscal powers) are also needed. These steps aren't much, and don't fundamentally change the system, but once people
see what can be done, the agenda can be advanced.

back to top

Paul says Take the future into our own hands

Going beyond New Labour is necessary because staying where we are is not an option. Nor can we turn the clock to the days of Old Labour. They were pretty hopeless anyway - attacks on public service pay, mass unemployment and spending cuts. We have to move forward with democratic representation, democratic ownership and control through taking the future into our own hands.

back to top

Loic says People should have a voice

I think that every Citizen and every People on this planet should have the right to express his view and be considered as a member of a communal society.

Politics shouldn¹t be based just on a party and neither just on an electoral representative system.

Nowadays no single voice is heard in the UK by the current regime, nor were 2 millions voices demonstrating against war on the 15 Feb 2003 in London.

So it becomes important to change the situation not for change¹s sake, but for a new deal in a new democracy which is not only global but also local, and building a network for such a change is part of it.

back to top

Robbie says Time to debate a replacement for New Labour

The only things New Labour can bring us is the crassness of the market, the selling-off of our essential services, more lies and more wars. There can be no going back to old Labour (no bad thing anyway) so we have to start the debate on what can be built in its place. If we want a future beyond shopping and wars, then we must go beyond New Labour.

back to top

Corinna says Democracy is a sham

We need to go beyond New Labour because it does not represent the interests of the majority of people in Britain.

By going to war against Iraq despite mass demonstrations it proved beyond any doubt that democracy is a sham.

New Labour is part of a facade, behind which are those who have the real power - British and global corporations together with the security services rule without control or fetters.

The possibility of reforming New Labour from within or without is impossible because almost all democratic channels are being closed down. Left MPs and dissenting voices will be de-selected or disqualified to undermine whatever chance they still have to speak out.

We need a different kind of representation in order to own and control the economic system under which we live.

back to top

Pam says Business given a free hand

Governments of all colours do not represent the people, they represent business interests.

New Labour/Conservative pay lip service to the view that the capitalist system needs a safety net for the low paid and less able people in our society.

We are about to lose our Universal National Health service as we know it and will undoubtedly have to suffer an Americanised two tier highly expensive system.

Certain institutions need to be run efficiently for the pure benefit of the people they serve not as a business for making profit for the owners:- Gas, electricity, Water, Railways, NHS.

We could loose many of our, now fully or partially privatised, Institutions (Gas, Electricity, Railways, NHS) to foreign companies forever once the GATS system comes into play, later this year and sadly the ordinary person will know nothing about it.

New Labour has not reinstated any of the Union powers after their decimation during the Thatcher years, therefore, business organisations ( which now include most public services) have virtually a free hand in the way they pay and treat their workers in terms of conditions of work.

back to top

Penny says Take control of the economy

New Labour is not just a more right-wing version of Old Labour. It is a product of the transformation of the world due to the globalisation of the world economy. The only role for nation state governments is as facilitator and manager of countries on behalf of business - the business of the world is said to be business, and it must dominate every part of the planet and every minute of the life of the individual.

Going beyond New Labour means going towards a future where the business of human beings is to live creative and interesting lives, working in a mutually co-operative way, with equality and the protection of the environment from destruction.

Some aspects of globalisation have lots of potential for the people of the planet - and for nature as a whole - but we need to take control of the world economy and run it for the good of the majority.

People might say that is utopian - but it would be easier to achieve that, than to get New Labour to turn back into old Labour - now that really is impossible!

back to top

Anna says People feel faceless and powerless

"Nothing is more barbarous than war, nothing more miserable...There is nothing more pitiful than a nation being swept along by foolish leaders." Daisaku Ikeda, 'The Human Revolution,' vol 1, p.1

War is caused by people. It is therefore up to people whether or not we will create a world of peace. Let's create an atmosphere where every single child, woman and man feels that they can have an effect on what happens in the world of the 21st century. To be motivated by the politics of humanity rather than the politics of power in its various guises and to begin the work of creating environments be they corporate, commercial, political, governmental, where human beings are valued over bureaucracy, money, corporations, Council Tax (don't ask!), politics, celebrity or status.

People have begun to feel faceless and powerless in this technology driven world with larger and larger organizations swallowing the voice of the individual (please press 1 if you agree, 2 if you disagree, 3 if.....) and it is our responsibility to harness these amazing advances for the good of each individual life rather than the wealth and convenience of a comparative few, and to encourage each other to find our voice so we can create the kind of world we are proud to be a part of.

However tempting it is to retain, we must discard the 'Us and Them' mentality because it disempowers, and learn through heart to heart dialogue with those with whom we have an affinity and with those with whom we disagree (aka. Ghandi, Mandela, Ikeda, et al). This requires us to seriously look at ourselves to discover what it is within us that blocks us from achieving this so that we can turn it around and discover how very powerful we truly are. As world citizens we must take decisive action in the most important themes we grapple with today - peace, human rights, the environment and development. We can change anything we put our minds to (but maybe not by September!) The world is waiting.

"In a successful organization, some authors propose using a model based on the image of a flock of geese flying in a 'V' formation, with the leadership of the flock changing frequently as different geese take turns leading the way. It is a model in which everyone in the organization takes responsibility, everyone is equal and everyone unites together solidly in their shared objective. An organization of this kind, the authors argue, will be successful in the changing times in which we live." Daisaku Ikeda, president of SGI, in a talk on 23/06/96.

back to top

Judith says New Labour has increased inequality

In his manifesto when he was elected, Mr Blair promised to improve education. The opposite has happened ­ the system as it stands is failing our children and young people in many ways. To mention a few examples of this failure: practically non-existent nursery education, a constant emphasis on testing, league tables and a curriculum that is far too rigid. New Labour has abolished university grants and allowed the elite universities to charge.

The inequality of this government¹s policies is very apparent right across the board. Failing directors are given huge financial rewards ­ golden handshakes, while a third of the population struggle to survive on the minimum wage. A Labour government should not continue to create an ever-widening gap between the rich and the poor.

New Labour has increased Council Tax which discriminates against the poor. A much fairer way of producing revenue would be to increase income tax and make it more progressive.

Blair has stated that he wishes to be at the heart of Europe and yet he hesitates about becoming a full member and accepting the European currency. We should be building a much stronger unity with Europe not with America.

Under this government, public services have deteriorated and are in complete disarray, many services totally fragmented into hundreds of different companies, all bent on making a profit. There are, for example, 1600 different companies involved in the railway. Public services should offer services for the people not a means of gaining more profit.

back to top

Richard says Democracy now!

Blair and Blairism must be rooted out swiftly and with forceful determination as the damage to British democracy is now very serious. This I suggest will only come about by the combined efforts of all political shades of democrats: old Labour. liberal Conservatives and Lib-Dems.

Democracy isn't and must not be seen as a left-wing prerogative and all true democrats must link arms if those of us who still believe that Parliamentary representative democracy is the least imperfect system of Government is to be saved and re-established. Phoney Tony and his Cronies must be stopped in their tracks now.

back to top

 

 

You tell us why we need to go beyond New Labour:

info@nepd.org.uk

 

Pat's thoughts about the direction some Old Labourites are proceeding in

Loic sends his greetings from Grenoble

Kate writes We need to get beyond being "lefty"

Andrew says We live in a parliamentary democracy still

Dan says Sustained campaign required

Paul says Take the future into our own hands

Loic says People should have a voice

Robbie says Time to debate a replacement for New Labour

Corinna says Democracy is a sham

Pam says Business given a free hand

Penny says Take control of the economy

Anna says People feel faceless and powerless

Judith says New Labour has increased inequality

Richard says Democracy now!

 

 
contact us | e-mail me site updates | comment on this page | privacy policy